Some of the most interesting and important work that is done by members of the Centre involves sub-Saharan Africa and especially Tanzania. Investigators who are members of the Centre with significant involvement in Tanzania include Sarah Cleaveland, Heather Ferguson, Katie Hampson, Dan Haydon, and many others. They are a dedicated lot, probably the most collaborative and ego-free bunch of scientists I’ve ever met, and fantastic people to boot.

In celebration of the links between Glasgow and Africa, on May 20th, the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences will host an event which will bring together people with interests in conservation and development in Africa, with guests from partner institutions in Tanzania with whom we have long-standing and growing collaborations.  The event also marks the inaugural lecture of Markus Borner, who has recently been appointed an Honorary Professor in our Institute.

The Tanzanian guests include Dr. Simon Mduma, the Director General of the Tanzanian Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI); Dr. Julius Keyyu – Director of Research at TAWIRI; Paul Gwakisa, the Dean of the School of Life Sciences and  Bioengineering at the Nelson Mandela African Institute of Science and  Technology in Arusha; Alan Kijazki, Director General of Tanzanian National Parks (TANAPA), and Rudovick Kazwala, Professor of Veterinary  Medicine and Public Health at Sokoine University of Agriculture.The event is open to the public and the schedule will involve three half hour talks followed by a reception in the Hunterian Zoology museum in the Graham Kerr Building at the University of Glasgow.  ‘Doors open’ at 17.00, talks will start at 17.15.

Dr Simon Mduma: The natural history of Tanzania and its conservation responsibilities
Professor Markus Borner: Elephant Trails vs Highways: Conflicts between Biodiversity Conservation and Development
Professor Paul Gwakisa:  One Health: Understanding Infectious Diseases in their Ecological and Social Context

There is a reception to start approximately 18.45 on the day; the event is free and all are welcome, however people wishing to attend should register here, with further information at www.glasgow.ac.uk/tanzanianationalheritage.com

ADDENDUM: This event is now fully booked.

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2 comments

  1. I thought in all movements you go from stable to stable position through a quick unstable position. A funny video about a robot that “knows” how to go back to equilibrium (from my days in the robotics department).

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